Monday, April 21, 2008

Classic rock (really classic!)



Added: January 23, 2008 (Less info)
In 2007 we brought the love and joy of Billy Joel to the Latin Summer School, with an ad hoc performance of For The Longest Time -- 'Diutissime'. This time we prepared a Latin version of Eric Clapton's Layla, written in the persona of Catullus, singing to his Clodia: see if you can pick up all the references. The Latin is written in alternate lines, with the original lyrics underneath in square brackets. There are opportunities to sing along, and if you're daring enough, pick out your own Clodia to dance with...

Lyrics: Jermir J Punthakey
Performed on Thursday, 17th January, 2008 with: Jermir J Punthakey on vocals and backing guitar, David Brotherson on lead guitar.
Latin Correction: Chris Ransom
Filming: Nathan Tam
Special Thanks To: Arthur Kam
Original Soundtrack: Eric Clapton - Layla


CLODIA (LAYLA IN LATIN)

Quid facies cum esses sola
[What'll you do when you get lonely]
Nemoque manet latere tua?
[And nobody's waiting by your side?]
Cucurristi et diu celavisti
[You've been running and hiding much too long.]
Scis solum esse stultam superbiam.
[You know it's just your foolish pride.]

Clodia, habes me genu meo
[Layla, you've got me on my knees.]
Clodia, carissimam te oro
[Layla, I'm begging, darling please.]
Clodia, cara nonne leves anxium animum.
[Layla, darling won't you ease my worried mind.]

Conatus sum dare solamen
[I tried to give you consolation]
Cum 'Rufe frustra' demisit.
[When your old man had let you down.]
Ut stultus, coepi amare te
[Like a fool, I fell in love with you,]
Terrarum orbem confudit.
[Turned my whole world upside down.]

Clodia, habes me genu meo
[Layla, you've got me on my knees.]
Clodia, carissimam te oro
[Layla, I'm begging, darling please.]
Clodia, cara nonne leves anxium animum.
[Layla, darling won't you ease my worried mind.]

Reparemus condicionem
[Let's make the best of the situation]
Ante 'fieri excrucior'
[Before I finally go insane.]
Non negat umquam invenimus viam
[Please don't say we'll never find a way]
'impensius uror' non frustra
[And tell me all my love's in vain.]

Clodia, habes me genu meo
[Layla, you've got me on my knees.]
Clodia, carissimam te oro
[Layla, I'm begging, darling please.]
Clodia, cara nonne leves anxium animum.
[Layla, darling won't you ease my worried mind.]

[Solo + backing]

Clodia, habes me genu meo
[Layla, you've got me on my knees.]
Clodia, carissimam te oro
[Layla, I'm begging, darling please.]
Clodia, cara nonne leves anxium animum.
[Layla, darling won't you ease my worried mind.]

Clodia, 'odi et amo'
[Layla, you've got me on my knees.]
Clodia, 'da mi basia mille'
[Layla, I'm begging, darling please.]
Clodia, 'vivamus atque amemus' iam.
[Layla, darling won't you ease my worried mind.]


Nota Bene:
-Verse 1 line 4: sibilance.
-Verse 2 line 2: 'Rufe frustra' is a reference to Poem 77 (ad Rufum): 'Rufe mihi frustra' -- Rufus being Clodia's lover at the time of writing.
-Verse 3 line 2: 'fieri excrucior' is a reference to Poem 85 (odi et amo): 'nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior' -- "I do not know, but I feel it and I am in agony".
-Verse 3 line 4: 'impensius uror' is a reference to Poem 72 (ad Lesbiam): "I burn with passion more fiercely".
-Final chorus, line 1: 'odi et amo' is a reference to Poem 85 (odi et amo): "I hate and I love".
-Final chorus, line 2: 'da mi basia mille' is a reference to Poem 5 (ad Lesbiam): "Give me a thousand kisses".
-Final chorus, line 3: 'vivamus atque amemus' is a reference to Poem 5 (ad Lesbiam): 'vivamus mea Lesbia, atque amemus' -- "Let us live, my Clodia, and let us love".
Category: Music
Tags:
LSS latin summer school eric clapton layla clodia catullus poetry

2 comments:

Augustinian Successor said...

Aww ... be consistent fro once ... talk about the Church being a COUNTER-CULTURE!

Father Hollywood said...

Aug:

I'm not sure what you're going after here, this post has nothing to do with the Church. These people are Latin students, and I have no idea what religion they are.

The Latin works they are referring to are not medieval Christian writings, but rather the poetry of Catullus (which educated medieval Christians would certainly have been familiar with).

But I do agree that the Church is counter-cultural. And while I never had a "fro," I did used to sport a curly mullet "back in the day" FWIW. ;-)